Russian disinformation in the post-truth age: Lessons from the 2020 US Presidential Elections

By Paakhi Bhatnager Post-truth is not a novel phenomenon; subjectivity and bias have always influenced the way information is disseminated and reality is perceived. However, the term has gained significance in the aftermath of the 2016 US elections. Indeed, it  is owing to the increasing use of technology and the consequent easier availability of conflicting ideas and opinions that post-truth has surfaced as a buzzword … Continue reading Russian disinformation in the post-truth age: Lessons from the 2020 US Presidential Elections

Made Democracy strong again

By Julia Huentemann, 3rd year Student in International Relations and Editor-in-Chief of International Relations Today.  Following the presidential elections on November 8th, 2016, the United States held its Midterm Elections on Tuesday November 5th, while the world was eagerly watching how America voted halfway through Trump’s term in office. What mandates stood for election? Both chambers of Congress, the Senate (consisting of 100 Senators, two … Continue reading Made Democracy strong again

Opinion | The Importance of Diplomacy in the Era of Trump

Jack Lashendock is a Second Year student at Gettysburg College in America. He currently serves as the President of his school’s International Affairs Association and Model United Nations team (IAA/MUN) and a Senator in the Gettysburg College Student Senate. He is pursuing a double major in International Affairs and Political Science and a double minor in History and Middle East and Islamic Studies. His area … Continue reading Opinion | The Importance of Diplomacy in the Era of Trump

COUNTER-TERRORISM: WHY BRITAIN NEEDS A RADICAL NEW STRATEGY TO TACKLE THE ROOTS OF EXTREMISM

By William Marshall, a first year International Relations Undergraduate at King’s College London with a special interest in Terrorism, Middle Eastern politics, the politics of ‘failed states’ and British Foreign Policy.  2017 has in many ways been a year of unprecedented success in the incessant struggle against violent extremism. It has seen the dramatic collapse of the so-called Islamic State with Iraqi President Haider Al-Abadi recently … Continue reading COUNTER-TERRORISM: WHY BRITAIN NEEDS A RADICAL NEW STRATEGY TO TACKLE THE ROOTS OF EXTREMISM

Could the Veneto and Lombardy referendums determine a stronger north-south division in Italy after the decisive vote?

A poster with instructions about Lombardy’s autonomy referendum is seen at a polling station in Lozza near Varese, northern Italy, October 22, 2017. By Chiara Valenti, a 3rd year International Relations Undergraduate at King’s College London.  Abstract: Throughout its 150 years of unification, Italy has suffered from a north-south divide based on an array of socio-economic shortcomings between regions. Regionalist parties in Italy have adopted … Continue reading Could the Veneto and Lombardy referendums determine a stronger north-south division in Italy after the decisive vote?

Catalonia: “Chronicle of a Coup Foretold

By Alfonso Goizueta Alfaro, a first year History and International Relations Undergraduate at King’s College London, and author of the diplomatic history book “Limitando el Poder, 1871-1939: Historia de la Diplomacia Occidental” The world was shocked on October 1st: many people were because the images of police charges against voters in Catalonia; Spain was because of the disloyal and rebellious course that a democratic institution, … Continue reading Catalonia: “Chronicle of a Coup Foretold

What does ‘Xi Jinping Thought’ mean for China and the world?

By Coline Traverson,  a second-year undergraduate student in War Studies interested in environmental security, human rights and international politics. If you had tried to contact anyone in China from abroad last week, you might have realised that it was close to impossible due to a heightened Internet censorship. Surprisingly, this is not a worrying trend due to the increase in communications’ surveillance which is perhaps … Continue reading What does ‘Xi Jinping Thought’ mean for China and the world?

The Iranian Irritation:​ President Trump’s menace to the Iran Deal

Clément Briens is a second-year undergraduate student in War Studies & History with an interest in Cybersecurity and Nuclear Proliferation. On October 15th, Donald Trump must decide in front of US Congress whether to certify that Iran is complying with the JCPOA (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action) signed in 2015. After more than 20 months of negotiations, P5+1 countries (the Security Council Permanent 5 members+ … Continue reading The Iranian Irritation:​ President Trump’s menace to the Iran Deal

Relieving the Disaster: Hurricane Irma in the Caribbean

  Airport in the British Virgin Islands trashed – Taken by 70sqd offloading Royal Marines By William Reynolds, a third year War Studies undergraduate. From a British Armed Forces background, William follows the military capabilities of the West and the security issues in the Middle East with great interest, placing special emphasis on COIN and the experiences of individuals on the ground. William has worked … Continue reading Relieving the Disaster: Hurricane Irma in the Caribbean

What Interventionists get wrong about Venezuela

Carly Greenfield is a third year International Relations student with an interest in non-wartime violence, gender theory, and organized crime, especially in Latin America. The ongoing crisis in Venezuela has received mass media attention across the West, particularly in the United States (US). The crisis began following a Supreme Court attempt in March to dissolve the legislative branch and the subsequent protests against this decision. … Continue reading What Interventionists get wrong about Venezuela